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#21 J.Q. Murder

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 10:11 AM

So are we all Postmodernists up in here then. I guess it's not possible to be anything else talking about this stuff on the net. Or is it. I wonder if we could get a Marxist critique going of some wrestling, it wouldn't be about the match itself though I suppose. In all seriousness though that's an interesting post Jerry, I'll have to dig out the old Oxford Dictionary of Critical Theory to find out if I fit in anywhere.

#22 JerryvonKramer

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 06:30 AM

Well JQ, I think a Marxist critique of wrestling would be very easy to do. It would take the form of your standard Althusserian ideology critique -- the ideologies and values being promoted and perpetuated are embodied in the faces, those against which they define themselves are embodied in the heels. The only complication comes in the Attitude era, especially with Austin and those sections of the fans who cheered for the NWO. For that, I'd switch to a Foucauldian analysis of power relations and rearticulate the standard line on power-containment, i.e. the dominant power actively fosters dissidence only to contain that dissidence. In the Austin case, the WWF were actively fostering a dissident perspective in Austin, but in fact the net result of what they were doing reinforced the status quo (i.e. everyone gives their money to the The Man aka Vince). The narrative of dissidence is entirely contained in the product -- the same fans who cheer wildly for Austin and boo Mr. McMahon, are the same fans giving their money to the real Mr. McMahon for tickets, Austin t-shirts and so on. It's not real dissidence but the illusion of dissidence. Wrestling lends itself almost too readily to this sort of analysis, to the point where actually making it feels a little trite (because the conclusions feel so obvious).

#23 El-P

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 09:31 AM

Chris Benoit was a very Althusserian worker...

#24 JerryvonKramer

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 09:35 AM

Did El-P just make the most simultaneously distateful and high brow joke in the history of wrestling forums? I laughed.

#25 El-P

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 06:46 AM

the most simultaneously distateful and high brow joke in the history of wrestling forums?


Thanks for the nice compliment.:)

#26 JerryvonKramer

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 02:46 PM

El-P, the stereotype is that philosophers are celebrities in France. Is that true in any way?

#27 El-P

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 02:56 PM

Blame BHL (Bernard-Henri Levy). Guys like him or Alain Finkelkraut are media attention whores. But I'm not sure you can call these guys philosophers. Not exactly an expert on that field. But Gilles Deleuze they aren't.;)

#28 JerryvonKramer

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 06:45 AM

El-P, I happen to be giving a lecture on Althusser next week, and for my classes I often put together video packages to play in the first 5 minutes or so. I have done one for this lecture, and couldn't resist slipping in a fairly massive wrestling reference so thought I'd share it with you:

http://www.sendspace.com/file/niaw8q

#29 El-P

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 09:28 AM

Ah ah ah ! How are you going to refrain yourself from strutting around the desk when the song pops up ?;)




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