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#61 Matt D

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 04:16 PM

What always amazed me in the 80s was the sheer amount of money that JCP was charging for a show on video.

#62 Bix

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 05:03 PM

Most home videos were priced for rental, meaning they had higher prices than retail "sell-through" videos of children's movies and whatnot that stores had to invest in and make up. Even the highest priced wrestling videos were cheaper than studio movies, though. Only the $9.99 30-60 minute "greatest hits series" type wrestling tapes were sold at retail. In the long thread about Blockbuster's mass closing of stores at the last version or the DVDVR forum, it was mentioned that one of the reasons porn was so profitable for non-chain video stores was that they cost something like $5-$10 each. Stores broke even right away. Also, by '88 at the latest, the Turner Home Enterainment JCP titles were selling for $30 shipped.

#63 BrickHithouse

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 05:15 PM

I picked up a whole ton of NWA/WCW vhs for $5 each, factory sealed, from a flyer that WCW sent out to mag subscribers sometime in 1992. They didn't offer Starrcade 88 for some reason, so I went to a Hollywood Video to try to order thru them. $89.99, fuckin' crazy.

#64 ohtani's jacket

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 05:36 PM

Authorship on Application: compilation of film footage & all other cinematographic material: Evart Enterprises, Inc., employer for hire.
Previous Registration: Preexisting material: some film footage.
Basis of Claim: New Matter: "compilation of film footage, script, and all other cinematographic material."


It is an oddity.


Apparently, Evart and A & H Video Sales Representatives were the same company. They filed the trademark for Coliseum Video under the name A & H -- http://www.trademark...o-73545435.html and were listed as such in the Ventura lawsuit -- http://caselaw.findl...it/1387808.html

On this early Coliseum release you can see them claiming the rights to the package design and summary -- http://i68.photobuck...xplosivetnt.jpg

Later, they're listed as the copyright holder on some releases -- http://www.wrestlene...sualMatches.jpg

#65 BruiserBrody

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 09:26 PM

Did Verne beat Vince to the punch with either the Remco Toys or (crappy) 30 min VHS releases? Both had to be around 1985 releases. How did JCP manage to never get in the toy game?

#66 flyonthewall2983

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 12:04 AM

I picked up a whole ton of NWA/WCW vhs for $5 each, factory sealed, from a flyer that WCW sent out to mag subscribers sometime in 1992.


I got something similar from WWF magazine in 1996. I don't remember if they were that much, but one day in the mail I got a catalog featuring all of their VHS titles for some reason. Weird thing is is that the subscription stopped a few years earlier.

To bring this back on topic





Burt's got stories for days in these.

#67 jdw

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 07:43 PM

Authorship on Application: compilation of film footage & all other cinematographic material: Evart Enterprises, Inc., employer for hire.
Previous Registration: Preexisting material: some film footage.
Basis of Claim: New Matter: "compilation of film footage, script, and all other cinematographic material."


It is an oddity.


Apparently, Evart and A & H Video Sales Representatives were the same company. They filed the trademark for Coliseum Video under the name A & H -- http://www.trademark...o-73545435.html and were listed as such in the Ventura lawsuit -- http://caselaw.findl...it/1387808.html

On this early Coliseum release you can see them claiming the rights to the package design and summary -- http://i68.photobuck...xplosivetnt.jpg

Later, they're listed as the copyright holder on some releases -- http://www.wrestlene...sualMatches.jpg


Yep. Look like on some of the early ones the claimed sole copyright, either by mistake in printing it, or in the WWF/Titan being slow on the uptake to get their own claims in.

So Coliseum = Evart and A & H Video Sales Representatives.

Strange that it took so long for Vince to cut them out, either to do it in house or move to some other license. Would assume that Coliseum/Evart took low enough cuts and/or their distribution was good enough for Vince and/or there just wasn't massive money in tapes for Vince.

The Ventura ruling you point to gives some info:

Anson arrived at his estimate of damages by applying a royalty percentage to Titan's revenues from wholesale distribution of the tapes.   The sales figures for the ninety videotapes upon which Ventura appeared were not available, but net profits (a more conservative measure) were established to the penny ($25,733,527.94).


Jesse left the WWF in August 1990, filed suit in December 1991, and expert reports would have been a couple of years after that. Jesse was on most of the stuff produced from 1985 when they launched through 1990, all of the Manias from I to VI... $25M probably was the vast majority of the profit off sales through at least the end of 1990 with some legacy stuff being sold after that. Say an average of $4.3M a year from 1985-90, with it below that early on and comfortably above it towards the end.

"Profit" isn't really "profit", because it's likely Hogan gets his cut after that number, etc:

During each negotiation, Bloom asked Glover whether Titan had changed its policy regarding the payment of videotape royalties, and each time Glover reiterated that no talent received videotape royalties unless they were the featured performer on a videotape.   Glover also told Ventura of this policy.   Bloom and Ventura relied on Glover's statements concerning Titan's royalty policy, and understood that by entering into fee agreements they waived any right Ventura had to royalties.   Despite these representations, Titan simultaneously made numerous royalty payments which were inconsistent with the purported policy of not paying royalties except to featured performers.10

10. In 1985, 1986 and 1987, Titan paid videotape royalties to Hulk Hogan and Marvel Comics for “Wrestlemania I,” “II” and “III,” despite the fact that there was no featured performer in these productions.   During 1988, Titan paid videotape royalties to all 54 wrestlers appearing in the “Survivor Series,” to all 57 wrestlers appearing in “Wrestlemania IV” and to all 38 wrestlers appearing in “Summer Slam '88.”   Again, these payments were inconsistent with Titan's stated policy because none of these videotapes had one featured performer.   Beginning in December 1988, Titan paid royalties to all wrestlers appearing in videotapes of pay-per-view events.


So Vince wasn't pocketing $4M+ without costs. But still...

That's not a bad revenue stream. Not major relative to PPV or house shows, but not a bad extra bonus to toss to workers whenever Vince got around to paying them.

John

#68 jdw

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 07:51 PM

Most home videos were priced for rental, meaning they had higher prices than retail "sell-through" videos of children's movies and whatnot that stores had to invest in and make up. Even the highest priced wrestling videos were cheaper than studio movies, though. Only the $9.99 30-60 minute "greatest hits series" type wrestling tapes were sold at retail.


Yep. The video business didn't think people wanted to own stuff, despite people paying a ton for Star Wars when it hit video and laser disc. One guesses they pawned that off on something special rather than there being a market for it.

On the other hand, chains like Blockbuster and the others were signing up deals with the studios, so it felt like free money to the studios.

Felt like DVD changed that, but it might have happened just before DVD?


In the long thread about Blockbuster's mass closing of stores at the last version or the DVDVR forum, it was mentioned that one of the reasons porn was so profitable for non-chain video stores was that they cost something like $5-$10 each. Stores broke even right away.


Yep... porn was often priced to move for consumers. There long was mail order, sale at porn stores, and other distribution. Though they probably weren't dealing with royalties with a lot of the performers: flat fee for a scene or scenes in a movie, and that's the end of paying Ginger and Tom Byron. After you pay costs, every sale is profit without royalties.


Also, by '88 at the latest, the Turner Home Enterainment JCP titles were selling for $30 shipped.


I'm trying to remember what the two video Best of Starcade went for when originally put on sale. More than $30 since it was two tapes?

#69 thebrainfollower

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 11:07 AM

JDW it happened way before DVD, it started in 1989 when Batman came out on VHS for only $24.99 and sold like gangbusters. That wasn't seen as a special one off like Star Wars (remember my point about Hollywood usually needing TWO examples to start a trend). Within a few years, low priced VHS tapes of everything were available. To put into perspective how fast this change was in 1989 Universal had put out only 8 of its classic horror movies on VHS (all for $50-80 and some whose selling point was critic Gene Shallit on the cover). By 1992 you could get over 40 of them on VHS for $15 a pop. The video market exploded in the very early 90's and owning stuff became the norm. DVD certainly expanded that field but it was done with VHS.

#70 xlynwoodx

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 08:59 PM

I seem to remember there being a time where VHS would be available for rent for a short time period before they were available to purchase. I believe the prices were outrageous at first but would then go down to a more reasonable price. I assume the video rental places had some sort of deal worked out with the studios here.

#71 flyonthewall2983

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Posted 05 September 2016 - 02:26 AM

On his podcast Bruce Prichard talked about the connection between Coliseum Video and porn, saying that the character of the Colonel in Boogie Nights was based on the head guy at A&H.






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