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Undertaker > Hogan


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#41 Guest_Nell Santucci_*

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 05:25 AM

This clip is amazing as Hogan's act unraveled almost overnight.

http://m.youtube.com...h?v=6EsBU8NQKoM

#42 El-P

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 05:38 AM

I don't see how anyone could argue Hogan is a bigger star than the Rock.


Agreed. But Hogan is probably the bigger "wrestling" star, while The Rock is "only" the bigger star, as odd as it may sound.

#43 JerryvonKramer

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 05:50 AM

I don't know how much you can judge from this but this is a little search thing that can give you stats on "mentions in rap songs".

http://www.theguardi...rs-lyrics-songs

You can see who has been mentioned most in rap songs in the past 30 years. Obviously there is a little bit of a problem with The Rock because actual rocks will be mentioned quite a lot. Ditto "Savage". Ditto Austin ("Stone Cold" is a common phrase, "Austin" has a lot of mentions pre-1990 because it's a common name, etc.) But you can do Hulk Hogan vs. John Cena for example.

Posted Image

Interesting to see that apart from a blip in the mid-00s, for the most part Hogan destroys Cena even in 2013.

Obviously you can play with this a bit by adjusting search terms. Straight up "Hogan" vs. "Cena" yields this:

Posted Image

#44 El-P

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 06:36 AM

That shit is hilarious.

#45 pantherwagner

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 09:11 AM

I don't see how anyone could argue Hogan is a bigger star than the Rock.


Agreed. But Hogan is probably the bigger "wrestling" star, while The Rock is "only" the bigger star, as odd as it may sound.


This is not odd at all. The Rock is pretty well known in places like Hong Kong or Malaysia or Taiwan where they have no clue that he is/was a pro wrestler. He's just a big actor dude, like Vin Diesel.

#46 Childs

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 09:37 AM

Yeah, people are conflating the question of biggest mainstream star with the question of biggest wrestling star. Rock is certainly a bigger star to the average person than Bruno Sammartino or Steve Austin. But I don't think he's been as important to the WWE/WWF's business as those guys were. To be fair, his role in the last three Wrestlemanias gives him a better argument. Hogan still resides on another planet from all those guys.

#47 jdw

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 05:47 PM

Might it be argued that Austin was more relatively important than Hogan? Hogan was the head of the 80s boom but I feel like that was thanks to cable, national expansion, Vince's vision etc and could've happened with a number of big, charismatic Champions on top (not that there are a whole lot of guys who fit that bill as well as Hogan). The Attitude Era boom though feels like a real outgrowth of Austin himself.


I think we've gone around this block before. There isn't anyone who Vince could have expanded like he did with Hogan. Vince was the right promoter to do it. The WWF was the right regional promotion to launch it from. Hogan was the right wrestler to anchor it with. 1983/84/85 was the right time frame to do it. Stars aligned. But Hogan was as essential as the rest of the things.

John

#48 cm funk

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 02:46 PM

I don't see how anyone could argue Hogan is a bigger star than the Rock. Hogan couldn't even make it in Hollywood and without his reality show, and all its drama, his name recognition wouldn't even be half what it is today. Further, Hogan is also seen as a clown by the public and has been since the 1991 Arsenio fallout.

Austin was too short lived with not enough mainstream roles. I'd say Undertaker has far more name recognition than him, which is counterintuitive. Vince McMahon has as much name recognition as Austin, and shockingly few people seem to know who Vince is.

Mainstream recognition is weird that way.


I honestly think more people know who Hulk Hogan is than Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson

Yeah, Rock is a big movie star now, but Hogan was a pop culture icon

This will change eventually, but if you ask people right now, more of them know Hogan than they know Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson

#49 Karl

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 03:00 PM

Hogan at his peak was ingrained into popular culture. Rock is just a fairly famous person. The passage of time has perhaps lessened the appreciation as to how big a star Hogan was and during a time when there were far fewer things demanding our attention.

#50 SteveJRogers

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 07:49 PM

I will always use this story as the perfect example to illustrate how much Hulk Hogan = Pro Wrestling to the mass audience. I'm watching ESPN doing an NBA season opener report on the Bulls as they headed into the 1994 season, the first in the United Center. Now I've dropped off of following day-to-day wrestling at that point, but when the announcer stated that the stadium had opened in August with "a Hulk Hogan wrestling event" I did know enough that Hogan had parted ways with the WWF at this point, and assumed that the card was something he had promoted with others. It wasn't until I went to college a year later (September of 1995) that I realized WCW did not run shows through there in the summer of 1994, and the show the announcer was referring to was of course WWF's SummerSlam. A show that Hogan had not one bloody thing to do with! So there ya go, Hogan so transcends the sport, or at least transcended it at the time, that his name was affixed to it, even though simple research on the event would have revealed that he wasn't involved on that particular event. I'm sure one could be hard pressed to come up with another one like it, in terms of pro wrestling.

#51 NintendoLogic

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 08:19 PM

Dwayne Johnson may have a higher Q rating than Hulk Hogan, but to the public at large, he's an actor who used to wrestle rather than a wrestler who became an actor. My guess is that if you asked a bunch of non-fans to name a professional wrestler, they'd say Hogan 9 times out of 10.

#52 gingears

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 08:24 PM

I will always use this story as the perfect example to illustrate how much Hulk Hogan = Pro Wrestling to the mass audience.

I'm watching ESPN doing an NBA season opener report on the Bulls as they headed into the 1994 season, the first in the United Center. Now I've dropped off of following day-to-day wrestling at that point, but when the announcer stated that the stadium had opened in August with "a Hulk Hogan wrestling event" I did know enough that Hogan had parted ways with the WWF at this point, and assumed that the card was something he had promoted with others.

It wasn't until I went to college a year later (September of 1995) that I realized WCW did not run shows through there in the summer of 1994, and the show the announcer was referring to was of course WWF's SummerSlam. A show that Hogan had not one bloody thing to do with!

So there ya go, Hogan so transcends the sport, or at least transcended it at the time, that his name was affixed to it, even though simple research on the event would have revealed that he wasn't involved on that particular event. I'm sure one could be hard pressed to come up with another one like it, in terms of pro wrestling.

I suppose that would make the equation Undertaker + Undertaker < Hogan.

#53 JerryvonKramer

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 05:27 AM

lol

#54 Loss

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 07:11 AM

Hogan is the guy who is synonymous with wrestling for sure, but let's not overstate his place in pop culture. He's probably just slightly above the "Where's The Beef?" lady in stature.

#55 cm funk

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 07:34 AM

Hogan is the guy who is synonymous with wrestling for sure, but let's not overstate his place in pop culture. He's probably just slightly above the "Where's The Beef?" lady in stature.



Really? You compare the "Where's the Beef?" commercial to HULK HOGAN!?!

#56 Loss

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 07:37 AM

I would say it means about as much to your average person on the street, yes. He's not Michael Jackson, Tom Cruise, Oprah Winfrey or Arnold Schwarzeneger. He's an E-list celebrity at best.

#57 cheapshot

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 07:47 AM

I would say it means about as much to your average person on the street, yes. He's not Michael Jackson, Tom Cruise, Oprah Winfrey or Arnold Schwarzeneger. He's an E-list celebrity at best.


If you look outside the American bubble he is still, very much, a hugely recognisable and certainly deemed a famous celebrity.

I have asked 3 non wrestling fans just now and they have all heard of Hulk Hogan, which they have, and can exactly describe how he looks.

#58 Loss

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 08:02 AM

Yes, absolutely. But he's not a cultural icon in any shape or form. He's a sideshow name at best. I don't think he was ever "ingrained into popular culture", as was mentioned earlier in the thread. He was huge by wrestling standards, but not by pop culture standards.

#59 Guest_Nell Santucci_*

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 08:48 AM

Hogan is a yard stick short of Carrot Top who is more recognizable than almost all major movie actors, but qualitatively none of them will be remembered 100 years from now anymore than Gilbert Gidfrey will be. They're all generationally unique acts with a limited historical life span. The essence of this issue, a point I was making earlier, is they all have tremendous recognition but none are respected. They're like a sanitized version of a freak show.

#60 cheapshot

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 09:19 AM

An essay arguing Hogan as a cultural icon: http://popculture11....ays-hulk-hogan/




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