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Crazy Like A Fox - The Definitive Chronicle of Brian Pillman 20 Years Later


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#21 JaymeFuture

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Posted 12 December 2017 - 12:18 PM

For those interested in picking this up for Christmas, Amazon has an offer on - use this code for $5 off any $15 spent on any print book:

BOOKGIFT17

#22 dawho5

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Posted 12 December 2017 - 12:57 PM

I am about halfway through.  I really like seeing Pillman's side of things against the backdrop of 1990/1991 WCW.  I've been watching enough of that recently to see how chaotic the booking was and it is well represented in the book.



#23 JaymeFuture

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 10:31 AM

Thanks very much dude, let me know what you make of it as you progress through.

 

Had a big piece written on the book by Alex Marvez for Sporting News this past week, which can be seen here: http://www.sportingn...fb1r6glsguafb80



#24 dawho5

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Posted 18 December 2017 - 11:24 AM

Finished it up yesterday.  Great read and I liked that the end was upbeat in the face of all the tragedy.



#25 SPS

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 08:58 PM

Here's what I've written to post as my Amazon review once I get chance to post it later tonight,

 

 

"Finally got to sit down and finish this during the holiday break and was tremendously pleased with how much I enjoyed and learned from this book. This book was well worth the money and was so well put together and well written compared to some wrestling books I've read and I've read a whole lot of them.

 

The amount of stories and viewpoints from the people who knew Brian best from all different eras of his life both personally and professionally really helped paint the picture of who he was with both the amazing admirable qualities and the sometimes disturbing faults. Brian was by no mean a perfect person but his spirit and overall intentions when not clouded by his own demons or faults seemed to still shine through.

 

The pacing of the book was great as it didn't drag but also wasn't rushed and gave fair weight to all the milestones and periods of Brian's career that sometimes get glossed together in previous tellings of Brian's life and career especially his WCW struggles. Also the amount of obvious suffering and struggle the man went through as a child with the throat issues was explained in a way that I really could sit and take in how much of a struggle something like that had to be to endure, which I hadn't gotten before when talked about in other reflections of Brian's life.

 

The parts I enjoyed most were the bits of Brian's thirst for learning wrestling history and the funny story of him calling and riling up Lou Thesz by questioning of  him on some the accuracy of his book after consulting Stu Hart. The amount of books on conmen and research he did in crafting the Loose Cannon character really was fascinating and makes me want to seek out and read those books and check out the film House of Games. And the list of quotes of Brian's wit on commentary with JR in his WWF announcing stint had me rolling in laughter all these years later.

 

Overall the sentiment of a lot of the folks making the point of not feeling guilty for Brian's untimely death but rather sad and terrible about it happening is the same way I felt about his story and the fallout of what happened to his kids. It was sad and terrible that they were left without Brian and left with a mother and "step father" to use the term loosely that also were plagued by demons of addiction that made the whole family suffer in life in a way that Brian probably would've been devastated to see if he had lived.

 

I'd strongly recommend this book to any fan of pro wrestling especially of that era because the honesty and gems of information and sobering lessons are such valuable knowledge in truly gaining an understanding of the wrestling business as it was and what it can be without the proper checks and balances. How such a talented  and intelligent person can with some terrible choices anyone can make destroy and jeopardize their entire body of work and livelihood and the methods taken to attempt to remedy and salvage it can cause  their own self fulfilling prophecy and untimely demise and also leave those they hold most dear susceptible to those same demons in their absence."

 

 

So I loved the book and easily rank it in the top 5-10 wrestling books I've ever read. Thank you for putting such obvious great and hard work into this project as the result was such a fantastic read and journey on a person who really was a rare innovator in the history of professional wrestling.



#26 JaymeFuture

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 01:04 PM

Thank you both for the comments, glad to read that you enjoyed it.

Dawho - believe me, following the few chapters previous I was dying for a semblence of positivity to reveal itself.

SPS - please do post that! That's really massively appreciated, almost overwhelming. I know what you mean about looking at the literature Brian poured through to prep for the Loose Cannon, I did the exact same to try and grasp Pillman's outlook from that point and it really is something else.

#27 DMJ

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 02:53 PM

Haven't finished it yet, but am nearing the end. I went ahead and left a 5-star review on Amazon. 

 

Thank you for writing a wrestling book that is intelligent and well-researched. I posted my review under my wife's name (it was her Amazon account I ordered it on) and I'm hoping it helps spread the word on how good this book is.



#28 JaymeFuture

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 07:57 AM

Wow - thank you so much for leaving the Amazon review, I greatly appreciate that. Funnily enough heard from a couple of people this weekend saying they bought it based on those reviews, so I am extremely grateful.

#29 BigBadMick

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 03:25 AM

My wife bought me the book as a Christmas present. I'm up to the start of 1993 now. As everyone else has said, really good, detailed work on the early part of his life and career.

 

I hadn't really thought about how much he disappeared in the latter part of 1990, that was interesting. And I didn't know the first idea was a tag team with Benoit in late 1992.



#30 JaymeFuture

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 09:22 AM

Thank you very much - let me know what you think as you progress. In my opinion the book picks up as it goes along, though others seem to love the WCW section mid-90s the best, interestingly enough.

 

As a quick heads up, I was interviewed by Meltzer and Alvarez on Wrestling Observer Radio on Friday to talk about the book, which you can find at the following link: https://www.f4wonlin...-pillman-249756



#31 dawho5

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 11:09 AM

You're not wrong.  The WCW section was very good and I liked a lot of the info in there.  But the book itself really gets rolling at the end and gets hard to put down.  Well, up until that last little bit where you're wondering if there's even the faintest hope of a happy ending for somebody.






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