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The greatest cons in wrestling history


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#41 Jingus

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 11:46 PM

TNA cons anyone into listening to anything they have to say, ever: too many examples to name, but here's a new whopper.

Total Nonstop Action Wrestling says less than five percent of its grapplers have suffered in-the-ring injuries.



#42 kjh

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 04:25 AM

I don't know what tops Kevin Nash becoming a millionaire by framing an elbow, dying his hair, getting wasted and standing around making funny faces.


That reminds me of how Nash and Hall both got huge pay rises from Eric Bischoff in September 1996 because he was genuinely worried that they were returning to the WWF, even though they were under WCW contract, when the WWF started the whole fake Razor Ramon and Diesel angle. He also had a clause in his contract which stated that he had to be the second highest paid wrestler in the company behind Hogan (though out of the goodness of his own heart he did let Bret be paid more than him), guaranteeing himself several raises for doing sod all and his spot as a headliner.

What I admire the most about Nash though is how everyone by now should know that he's a carny con artist, yet he's still able to pull off cons like making TNA management believe he was willing to job for Chris Sabin and Wade Keller believe he's being completely honest in his shoot interviews with him.

#43 Loss

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 09:48 AM

Hulk Hogan cons WCW: There are plenty of examples of this, but my favorite is basically using the debut of Monday Nitro on TNT to hype his Pastamania restaurant and show off the menu, since the show took place in the Mall of America. Valuable air time, and WCW got nothing from it in return.

#44 Loss

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 09:50 AM

I don't know what tops Kevin Nash becoming a millionaire by framing an elbow, dying his hair, getting wasted and standing around making funny faces.


That reminds me of how Nash and Hall both got huge pay rises from Eric Bischoff in September 1996 because he was genuinely worried that they were returning to the WWF, even though they were under WCW contract, when the WWF started the whole fake Razor Ramon and Diesel angle. He also had a clause in his contract which stated that he had to be the second highest paid wrestler in the company behind Hogan (though out of the goodness of his own heart he did let Bret be paid more than him), guaranteeing himself several raises for doing sod all and his spot as a headliner.

What I admire the most about Nash though is how everyone by now should know that he's a carny con artist, yet he's still able to pull off cons like making TNA management believe he was willing to job for Chris Sabin and Wade Keller believe he's being completely honest in his shoot interviews with him.


Nash is great for being able to pull things off like this obviously, although with the favored nation thing, Hogan wasn't even paid for under WCW budget. He was technically an employee of Turner Home Entertainment. They moved him over so Bischoff could claim a (very, very small) profit for WCW in 1995, the first profitable year in the history of the company. Somewhere in there, there is at least one great con, probably two.

#45 Loss

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 09:54 AM

Brian Pillman cons the conmen: For one reason or another, booker Kevin Sullivan, possibly in league with Eric Bischoff, becomes enamored with the idea of tricking everyone - including the boys in the back - into thinking that his feud with Brian Pillman is a SH00T~!. Pillman gets in on the fun, calling Sullivan "bookerman" on a live PPV broadcast, and generally drawing the worked shoot ire of Eric Bischoff. To further work everyone who wasn't in on the angle, Pillman convinces Bischoff to give him a real release from his contract to make it look like Bischoff really fired him over his SH00T~! antics on TV. Bischoff complied, thinking this would really hammer home the notion that this was a SH00T~!. Having received his release from his WCW contract, Pillman immediately jumps ship to the WWF. Amazingly, Bischoff and Sullivan are never totally dissuaded from the notion that this particular brand of worked shoot angles are a bad idea, and Sullivan immediately gets to work on another one. As an indirect result, Chris, Nancy, and Daniel Benoit are dead. Oops.


I somehow missed this post before, but what an awesome post. 100% true.

#46 Boondocks Kernoodle

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 01:15 PM

Hulk Hogan cons WCW: There are plenty of examples of this, but my favorite is basically using the debut of Monday Nitro on TNT to hype his Pastamania restaurant and show off the menu, since the show took place in the Mall of America. Valuable air time, and WCW got nothing from it in return.

Would you really call that a con? To me, it just seems like a case of "Hey, guys, promote my restaurant." "Sure, Hulk!" I doubt there was much deception involved.

#47 Loss

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 01:19 PM

Hyping the restaurant is one thing, but it was a valuable hour of TV and they went pretty far with it. Did WWE ever build a RAW entirely around Fozzy?

#48 Boondocks Kernoodle

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 03:29 PM

They didn't build the show around it. It was a promo that couldn't have lasted more than two minutes. The show featured Pillman beating Liger, a Sting-Flair match, the return of Luger, Hogan beating Big Bubba, the setup for the next week's Hogan-Luger match, a Sabu promo, a V.K. Wallstreet promo, Scott Norton brawling with Randy Savage, and Mean Gene announcing some dude as a contest winner. All of this was given more attention than Hogan promoting shilling for PASTAMANIA, BROTHER.

#49 kjh

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 04:29 PM

Did WWE ever build a RAW entirely around Fozzy?


Actually Chris Jericho stringing TNA along by allowing them to air a Fozzy music video wasn't a bad con.

#50 shoe

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 05:00 PM

Here's another Nash one. Nash becomes booker. He does the bannana peel finish for Misterio. He uses this as example that he the booker does jobs so the rest of the boys should do business. He eventually takes Rey's mask rendering him Mini Konnan and then putting himself over Goldberg to end his streak. He conned a lot of the other wrestlers that he the biggest of the big would do jobs for the smallest of the small. Reality was that he put himself over even more in the end.

#51 Dylan Waco

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 08:29 PM

They didn't build the show around it. It was a promo that couldn't have lasted more than two minutes. The show featured Pillman beating Liger, a Sting-Flair match, the return of Luger, Hogan beating Big Bubba, the setup for the next week's Hogan-Luger match, a Sabu promo, a V.K. Wallstreet promo, Scott Norton brawling with Randy Savage, and Mean Gene announcing some dude as a contest winner. All of this was given more attention than Hogan promoting shilling for PASTAMANIA, BROTHER.


Yes, but the point is that they ran a free show, in a foreign area, away from the companies base. They essentially tanked what could have been a very big gate, because Hulk Hogan wanted to find a way to get infomercial time and a walk up business for his spaghetto outlet store.

#52 Dylan Waco

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 08:35 PM

Mark Henry channelled a failure at the Olympis and the ability to dunk a basketball on ABC sports Saturday morning celberity shows into a massive ten year contract for the E, the majority of the time spent either sidelined with injuries, working in developmental territories or doing a largely comedic gimmick centered around his sexual fetishes, which now looks almost like an elaborate self parody of the wrestling business, and particularly his main benefactor Vince McMahon. When it finally became time for new contract negotations, Henry who was often cited as one of the biggest waste of money in wrestling history and a guy who could reasonably be passed on for renewal, had a three to four month run of very high end performances, easily the best of his career, leading to him signing a new deal..shortly thereafter he gets another severe injury sidelining him for the better part of a year. When he comes back he gets another big push, which includes a burial of the previously protected gimmick charactor Boogeyman, before Henry goes to the press in the wake of the Benoit tragedy, shooting on the drug adicted psychopaths that litter the industry that he has coasted to a nice living on, with minimal effort, work and talent. Awesome

#53 Guest_teke184_*

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 01:23 AM

Don't blame Hogan completely for the "First Nitro at Mall Of America" stunt... Bischoff has a history of doing stupid shit like that that pre-dates the first Nitro. They did Bash At The Beach 1995 at Venice Beach, CA, with no gate. They did Hog Wild / Road Wild at Sturgis, SD, for 4 years with no gate. The former was Hogan's gimmick home town, while the latter was done to coincide with the bike rally that the motorcycle-enthusiast Bischoff wanted to be a part of. It wouldn't surprise me that the Nitro at Mall Of America was Bischoff's idea because it was near his hometown of Minneapolis and was known for being the biggest mall in the world at the time.

#54 Indikator

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 06:32 AM

When Norton debuted during the first Nitro he clearly said the word "bullshit" . I think something similar happened during the first Raw show. So if you want to have a successful tv show, start it with an audible 4 letter word.

#55 maxpower

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 10:38 AM

Dusty cons Jim Crockett right out of business I can't believe we've gone this far without the Dream making an appearance. Dusty gets into JCP and immediately pushes Steamboat out of the company so there's no competition for the #1 babyface, uses the Dusty finish at Starrcade 85, attaches himself to whatever hot act comes through the territory (RnR Express, Road Warriors, Sting), makes all of the heels talk about himself in their interviews no matter who they're feuding with at the time, becomes the pied piper of the face side (gotta love the Jimmy Garvin incident), pushes himself in the main events despite his increasing size, Dusty finishes in every town multiple times, burying all the UWF talent, the corporate jet, the office in Dallas, the Bunkhouse Stampede in the Meadowlands, his spite pretty much breaking up the original Horsemen, and finally wanting to put the title on Rick Steiner just to show that he could before TBS finally took over and gave him the boot.

I'm sure there's more I'm leaving out plus his cons in getting back into WCW, letting Flair walk with the belt, his booking tenure in TNA where he was surrounded by hot chicks, and back to the WWE. God bless Dusty.

#56 Loss

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 10:55 AM

I wanted to mention MECW hiring Tommy Fiero as their head booker, but I don't know who's responsible for that one.

#57 Bix

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 11:04 AM

Dusty finishes in every town multiple times, burying all the UWF talent, the corporate jet, the office in Dallas, the Bunkhouse Stampede in the Meadowlands

Dusty conned Jim Crockett into doing these? I thought Crockett did these on his own.

Also, it was the Nassau Coliseum, not the Meadowlands.

#58 kjh

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 11:08 AM

Here's another Nash one. Nash becomes booker. He does the bannana peel finish for Misterio. He uses this as example that he the booker does jobs so the rest of the boys should do business. He eventually takes Rey's mask rendering him Mini Konnan and then putting himself over Goldberg to end his streak. He conned a lot of the other wrestlers that he the biggest of the big would do jobs for the smallest of the small. Reality was that he put himself over even more in the end.


The time line of that is wrong. Nash did the banana peel finish with Misterio after he had beat Goldberg and took Rey's mask to attempt to divert heat away from his self indulgent booking. As a con it really wasn't that good, because I don't think it fooled the boys in the back at the time.

A better con was Hogan and Nash working an argument behind the scenes in the summer of 1998 to make Nash the champion of the boys who by that point hated the interfering, ego driven Hulkster and weren't keen on Nash either. It worked for a while, though they were too arrogant and brazen with the "finger touch of DOOM" angle to keep the con going.

#59 Loss

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 11:20 AM

The fun part of that is that Hogan, Nash and Bischoff decided to work everyone into thinking Hogan was retiring. They went pretty far with it, with Hogan going on Leno to make it legit and being "phased out" by Bischoff in favor of Nash and his vision after the disappointing Halloween Havoc '98 buyrate. It was known the whole time he would be coming back in six weeks.

#60 maxpower

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 11:55 AM

Dusty finishes in every town multiple times, burying all the UWF talent, the corporate jet, the office in Dallas, the Bunkhouse Stampede in the Meadowlands

Dusty conned Jim Crockett into doing these? I thought Crockett did these on his own.

You're right about the corporate jet (since guys were flying in that territory back in the 70's that was most likely the next logical step) but I believe I read in Sex, Lies and Headlocks that Dusty convinced Crockett Jr. (tho it may not have taken much) to move the operation from N.C. to the building in Dallas since he owned a home there. Am I remembering this wrong? I gotta dig up that book.




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