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Project Rewatch - PWG: The Good Shit


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#61 supersonic

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 09:40 AM

Giant-Size Annual #4 – July 29, 2007

Taped from Los Angeles, CA

 

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The Briscoes no-showed due to being too intoxicated for their flight (kudos at least for keeping kayfabe true based on their ROH direction in New Jersey,) causing their 2/3 falls match against PAC & Roderick Strong to be scrapped.  Kevin Steen vs. Necro Butcher is also scrapped, as is the PWG Title match between El Generico and Bryan Danielson.

 

Dream Hardcore Match
Necro Butcher vs. Bryan Danielson

 

The match that prevented me from giving up on wrestling many years ago, and it’s still clear to see why.  Anyone that loves Brock Lesnar’s 2017 sprints needs to see this, as it was hot, quick, heavy, and instantly focused.  Danielson was pissed about losing out on his PWG Title match tonight so he took out all his anger on Necro, who was ultimately mismatched even in his own environment.

 

Perhaps if the referee had obliged for this to under Falls Count Anywhere rules, Necro would’ve overcome the technically superior, highly-irritable Danielson, but that wasn’t meant to be.  Both busted each other open, with Danielson targeting Necro’s gash to force more bleeding, while Necro tried relying on crazy bumps on the outside.  That wasn’t enough though, for Danielson wouldn’t be denied on this night.  No matter what submission Necro would survive, Danielson was taking his fucking scalp, and did so with elbows to the head, forcing the ref to throw the match out.  An incredible spectacle.

 

Rating: ***1/2

 

Tag Titles Match
PAC & Roderick Strong vs. El Generico & Kevin Steen

 

Just a fantastic tag match belonging in the same conversation with the junior tags that regularly stole the show in NOAH.  The challengers got the job done here with the obvious strategy, which was to pick on the smaller PAC when the opportunity presented itself.  Steen in particular even trolled Strong at times; if there was something missing to put this over the top as the best match in PWG history, it was Steen’s failure to look for some type of obvious retribution on his loss to PAC at Holy Diver Down.

 

The best spot in the match would be Strong lifting PAC overhead to deliver a Frankensteiner near-fall on Generico, just absolutely beautiful and sensational.  Undoubtedly, PAC was the star in this one, delivering all the truly memorable highlights including a 450 Splash Elbow Drop and Shooting Star Knee Drop.  But once Strong ate a Yakuza Kick, that left PAC open to the Package Piledriver and follow-up Brainbuster.  Oh yeah, this adhered to tag legalities, showing that there’s no excuse to failing to be true professionals in the realm of tag team wrestling.

 

Rating: ****1/4

 

But this show wouldn’t be closed out by arguably the greatest match in PWG history.  No, it needed the greatest match in the company’s first 4 years to close out the anniversary show.

 

PWG Title Match
El Generico vs. Bryan Danielson

 

It would be 4 complete years, but PWG finally delivered a MOTYC.  Danielson wouldn’t be denied his scheduled title match, bandaged from the fight against Necro and citing all the multiple duties he pulled as ROH Champion.  The front office that arrived didn’t say shit, as Danielson just slapped Generico to kick the match off in front of this raucous audience.

 

Danielson dominated the first several minutes, not going for technical moves, but just blows, blows, blows to the fatigued champion.  It looked like this would be a complete squash, totally understandable with this being Generico’s 6th match in 48 hours with a coast-to-coast airline flight along with this ROH/PWG colleagues, and 3 of those matches ranging between ***3/4 and ****1/4 already.  But he would not go down without a fight, making a comeback at the slightest chance.

 

But this was Danielson’s night to close out on top.  After numerous Cattle Mutilations and elbow shots to the head, Generico had no choice but to actually tap out.  Perhaps this was soothed by having just won the Tag Titles.  No matter what, it was the smart choice since the rematch would be money and Danielson made it clear in the post-match that he’s open to it at any time.  Danielson does the rah-rah speech but it feels like a diet version compared to his verbal work in ROH.

 

This was just sensational with a tremendous crowd emotionally involved in this.  Instead of worrying about seeing incredible action and highlight reels, the crowd was divided, actually giving a shit about the result of the match, yet so happy to get the advertised main event.  The counters, Generico removing Danielson’s bandage, Danielson’s relentlessness, this had it all and delivered more in about 10 minutes than so many wannabe classics do with double or triple the match length.  Absolutely must-see.

 

Rating: ****1/2

 

A fantastic triple main event, including a classic tag match and the greatest match in PWG’s first 4 years to close out such a historic event for the company.  Grab the 3 matches that matter on the various compilations and enjoy.  Also be sure to compare Generico’s performance on this card to Paul London’s at ROH’s One Year Anniversary Show.

 

How to try topping tonight?  With the biggest weekend of the year and making it a triple-shot of course.

 

Up next – 2007 Battle of Los Angeles Night 1
Matches will include:
Los Luchas vs. Young Bucks
Austin Aries vs. Roderick Strong
Tyler Black vs. Alex Shelley
Doug Williams vs. Claudio Castagnoli
Jack Evans vs. PAC
Kevin Steen & El Generico vs. Dragon Kid & Susumu Yokosuka



#62 G. Badger

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Posted 25 November 2017 - 12:53 PM

The final three matches just meld together so well. Dragon and Generico are such true talents and this show really encapsulates that. Their performances during this time period helped PWG rise above mediocrity in my eyes.

As far as buying this on a comp, I'd recommend getting the full show for $10 on Highspots. They have sales this time a year plus you get the pleasure of watching things unfold as they were meant to. There's good stuff in the undercard too :) Not shilling but, that's a fair deal for a supershow from 10 yrs. ago.

#63 MikeCampbell

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Posted 25 November 2017 - 05:14 PM

PWG is pretty much the only reason I subscribe to the Highspots streaming service.



#64 Zoo Enthusiast

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Posted 25 November 2017 - 07:40 PM

PWG is pretty much the only reason I subscribe to the Highspots streaming service.

Man, there is so much good stuff on there.  If you like PWG, I think you should also be watching AAW.  Current CZW is pretty damn good, too.  Highspots WN is the best $10 in wrestling.



#65 supersonic

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 05:25 PM

2007 Battle of Los Angeles Night 1 – August 31, 2007

Taped from Los Angeles, CA

 

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PWG Champion Bryan Danielson kicks off the show, sporting an eyepatch, announcing that he’s unable to compete in the tournament due to the injury sustained at Manhattan Mayhem II. He says he’ll be available to compete on October 14 though.

 

Apparent Lucha Rules Match
Young Bucks vs. Los Luchas

 

Decent opener between quite some green upstarts. This was plagued not just by there being no established lucha or tornado rules (to explain the come-as-you-please lack of tag legalities), but some mistiming from Zokre in a couple spots involving Matt Jackson. There were some highlights to cherry-pick and use in future, much more seasoned matches of course, including a pop-up spear in the corner, as well as an instant Somersault Plancha to the outside.

 

The best highlight, and one that I’m surprised has seemingly not become a massively copied staple over the past decade, was Zokre locking on a Gory Special, Phoenix Star using the positioning to deliver an Angle Slam, landing on Zokre’s knees to deliver a double-team Gut Buster. That would be a tremendous idea if Roderick Strong ever gets to the main roster to reform his tag team with Danielson. Oh yeah, the finish was the spotty fun with the Bucks winning thanks to consecutive top rope splash variations.

 

Rating: less than ***

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament 1st Round Match
Austin Aries vs. Roderick Strong

 

Another quality chapter to this rivalry, although this wasn’t coming close to their classic earlier in the year at Supercard of Honor II. Rather than target the back of Aries, Strong aimed for his ribs perhaps to offset the core and set up for the obvious Gut Buster. The first time Aries teased a comeback, Strong turned into a strike exchange, cutting him off in the process. It would take the Stroke for Aries to cut off Strong, followed by his trademark suicide dive. But the highlight would be something I haven’t seen anyone else do before or since, which was Aries countering Strong’s O’Connor Roll by turning it into a Tombstone Piledriver.

 

Perhaps the work done on the ribs of Aries came the difference-maker; while he managed to hit the Quebrada and other moves involving abdomen bumps, Aries was cut off when going for his signature finishing combo. That’s the best explanation for why Strong was able to suddenly finish him off with a small package upon going for the Brainbuster. These two could sleepwalk their way to a *** contest.

 

Rating: ***1/2

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament 1st Round Match
Tyler Black vs. Alex Shelley

 

Disappointing match on paper, as this lacked the intensity of Aries vs. Strong. This also lacked Shelley’s mean streak that was on display in their tag classic the prior year at All Star Weekend IV Night 1. He used his experience to dominate on the mat early, but none of his submissions had the sizzle one would be conditioned to have expected from him by this point.

 

Black pulled out some spectacular moves without much of the special timing to make them dramatic that would go on to define his ROH and WWE tenures. A Running Stunner for a near-fall and Super Ace Crusher are the two best examples of that. The latter in particular was a major missed opportunity to be the hottest near-fall of the entire match had he been selling a sore body part, struggling to reach Shelley to make the pin.

 

Shelley’s Shiranui for the victory was ugly and once again got the appropriate midlevel reaction. His post-match promo was strange also, putting the roster over and giving a conditional farewell speech should his plane crash the next day and he can’t get back for Night 3.

 

Rating: ***1/4

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament 1st Round Match
Doug Williams vs. Claudio Castagnoli

 

This felt very much like a mid-card match on SmackDown with a stupid concrete bump from Williams thrown in. It never reached a high gear to be expected from two of the finest European imports of the 2000s. Instead it seemed to be mostly a low-level strike exchange with some Williams domination thrown in, minus the major body part targeting that made up so many of his ROH classics earlier in the decade.

 

Castagnoli’s Ricola Bomb for the victory was yet another sudden 1st round finish, except this time the crowd seemed even less crazed than earlier on the card. These two can do a lot better than this glorified TV filler three-snowflake special.

 

Rating: ***

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament 1st Round Match
PAC vs. Jack Evans

 

Another match that felt like TV filler. This high-flying dream match still delivered the spectacular moves, but not before Evans had control early on the match. PAC would cut him off by sweeping him and forcing an apron bump. They’d exchange more acrobatic moves, with the highlight prior to the finish being Evans pulling out his Sasuke Special.

 

It’s debatable that the match should’ve ended when PAC hit Evans with a Super Slingshot Neckbreaker, as it was the audible match peak for the crowd. However, the follow-up Tiger Suplex and Sky Twister was quick enough to not drag the crowd volume down, and this definitely feels the show-stealer for the night.

 

Rating: ***1/2

 

Tag Titles Match
Kevin Steen & El Generico vs. Dragon Kid & Susumu Yokosuka

 

Excellent main event that elevated this from being utterly forgettable. This was a pleasant surprising in adhering to tag legalities, as this easily could’ve exploded into a mess like the undercard tag match did. In this one, Steen used his heavier frame to avoid selling for the Typhoon tandem, but the challengers would use each other’s bodies to gain the advantage.

 

Dragon Kid’s Springboard Hurricanrana was a nice false finish, still showing that 17 months later, the trios masterpiece from Supercard of Honor was still fresh in the minds of the American indy audience. This had the usual signature spots seen from these four at the time, but it ultimately came down to Typhoon making the fatal mistake. That mistake? Relying on Dragon Kid to try overcoming Steen’s size, as the Hurricanrana counter was rolled through to be countered back into the Package Piledriver and follow-up Brainbuster. As mentioned, a splendid conclusion to the card.

 

Rating: ****

 

Recommended for a great main event and two undercard gems that were vastly different, that being another chapter in the Aries vs. Strong rivalry, and the high-flyers PAC vs. Evans dream match. In particular, the main event is a terrific resource to show indy wrestlers that there IS a formula to doing nonstop moves while appropriately adhering to fundamental tag team psychology.

 

Up next – 2007 Battle of Los Angeles Night 2
Matches will include:
Davey Richards vs. Nigel McGuinness
Dragon Kid vs. Susumu Yokosuka



#66 supersonic

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 05:25 PM

2007 Battle of Los Angeles Night 2 – September 1, 2007

Taped from Los Angeles, CA

 

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Battle of Los Angeles Tournament 1st Round Match
Davey Richards vs. Nigel McGuinness

 

Easily the match of the night, and rightfully so since this was the only singles encounter of their careers. With Richards not yet a main-eventer on the top indies yet, he played the underdog, seeing many of his early strike attempts being easily blocked by McGuinness. Why didn’t Richards just aim for lower body shots then?

 

There was a stalling moment that killed the pace in which McGuinness got smooches from a female at ringside, and Richards thought he could make it happy after getting the middle rope blatantly jerked into a low blow shot. After that, it became the story of Richards trying so hard to evade the various lariats of McGuinness, and he managed to kick out of one from the top rope, as well as a Tower of London. Once the rebound lariat was successful though, that was the ballgame. Gabe Sapolsky certainly has to regret not booking this sometime in 2008 as McGuinness was on top and the improvement of Richards became significantly more noticeable.

 

Rating: ***3/4

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament 1st Round Match
Dragon Kid vs. Susumu Yokosuka

 

Others may get a bit more out of this one since it was obviously more spot-oriented. The main story seemed to be similar to their tag together 24 hours earlier, with Yokosuka doing everything possible to avoid Dragon Kid’s Springbaord Hurricanrana. Everything built to Dragon Kid eventually hitting it and that was it. While a good match, there’s not much to recap and analyze since it didn’t violate any critical fundamentals, but also didn’t blow anyone away like CIMA vs. El Generico did 363 days earlier.

 

Rating: ***1/2

 

Buy this cheap for the 2 quality matches, as this was a lousy show with one of the most tasteless angles to ever take place, one that’ll be recapped later on when its saga includes must-see matches.

 

Up next – 2007 Battle of Los Angeles Night 3
Matches will include:
Joey Ryan vs. Roderick Strong
Matt Sydal vs. Alex Shelley
PAC vs. Claudio Castagnoli
CIMA vs. Shngo
Necro Butcher vs. Nigel McGuinness
El Generico vs. Dragon Kid
The semifinals and final of the 2007 Battle of Los Angeles tournament



#67 supersonic

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Posted 21 May 2018 - 05:27 PM

2007 Battle of Los Angeles Night 3 – September 2, 2007

Taped from Los Angeles, CA
 

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Battle of Los Angeles Tournament Quarterfinal Match
Joey Ryan vs. Roderick Strong

 

Understandably worked just like a one-segment TV match, considering whoever reaches the final has to pull triple-duty tonight. That’s not a criticism at all, as this was perfectly executed with Strong generally dominating unless Jade Chung bailed Joey Ryan out. As has seemingly been the case for her, there’s been no acknowledgement whatsoever of her history with Strong in ROH, which is disappointing. Something as simple as “I saved your skank ass from slavery and you hook up with these Arrogance pieces of shit, you fucking bitch?” would make for nice continuity. Her attempt to help Ryan out eventually backfired, as Ryan wasted time trying to win an argument against the ref with her, allowing Strong to hit the Tiger Driver and Liontamer for the victory.

 

Rating: less than ***

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament Quarterfinal Match
Matt Sydal vs. Alex Shelley

 

Quality matchup as expected, and yet again no reference at all to their ROH history, instead showing respect at the beginning. Sydal surprisingly was able to go toe-to-toe with Shelley, showing off his improvement from the past year or so in Dragon Gate. But Shelley had him scouted on multiple occasions, first by evading an Enziguri midway through.

 

But the killer came at the end, and if the indies were treated with more respect by WWE, this match could’ve been pointed to as one scouted by Randy Orton; years before he would do so to Evan Bourne, Shelley here countered Sydal’s Shooting Star Press with an Ace Crusher, bringing the crowd to its feet. A follow-up Tiger Suplex and Cross-Legged Brainbuster was just the cherry on top for Shelley to advance.

 

Rating: ***1/2

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament Quarterfinal Match
PAC vs. Claudio Castagnoli

 

First time matchup here with Castagnoli dominating most of the way due to his size and strength advantage. In this one, PAC channeled his work against previous larger opponents to look for bombs when the opportunities struck, with the biggest being when he had Castagnoli outside. That allowed PAC to leap outside via a Somersault Plancha and in mid-air turn it into a head scissors to gain control.

 

Castagnoli still regained control, but PAC was determined on this night, perhaps due to Dragon Gate officials being present. He managed to pull off the upset by cutting off a corner uppercut, turning a Moonsault Press into a Tornado DDT, and finishing it off with the Sky Twister. Huge upset here even with PAC beating former PWG Champion Kevin Steen earlier in the year.

 

Rating: ***3/4

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament Quarterfinal Match
CIMA vs. Shingo

 

Easily my favorite match of the night so far, as this had some heat in it due to tensions between Typhoon and New Hazard. However, what elevated this so far was that it had noticeable selling, as CIMA targeted Shingo’s bandaged right elbow. After working on it for a few minutes, Shingo did a fine job of paying it off, grimacing when using that limb to deliver a chop rather than switch to his left arm.

 

But it would be CIMA’s experience in the pin variations that became the difference-maker. While Shingo was elevated in kicking out of the Air Raid Crash, it was enough to put him down for good the second time CIMA locked a variation pin on him, after having failed to put him down with a modified La Majistral cradle minutes earlier. PAC’s got his work cut out for him against CIMA in the next round.

 

Rating: ***3/4

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament Quarterfinal – Hardcore Match
Necro Butcher vs. Nigel McGuinness

 

Short and sweet with the best crowd atmosphere to far thanks to Necro being a viscerally connecting star. He tried getting the advantage early by attacking McGuinness during his entrance and turning it into a hardcore match, but the former Pure Champion just targeted the hardcore legend’s bandaged right knee. This came into play later as Necro did a great job of selling. He managed to knock McGuinness down a few times with clotheslines but couldn’t get the momentum to turn them into lariats.

 

Necro was doomed when he couldn’t deliver a backbreaker on a chair, his knee buckling. This allowed McGuinness to suplex him onto it, with the damaged right knee landing perfectly on the edge of the chair. Splendidly worked and one has to wonder if Nick Gage could ever come into BOLA and steal the show as well as Necro did here.

 

Rating: ***3/4

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament Quarterfinal Match
El Generico vs. Dragon Kid

 

Excellent close to the quarterfinal round as this had some spunk to it. Dragon Kid decided to surprise Generico at the beginning with an immediate leg lariat, causing Generico to eventually get so frustrated he decided to play a bit dirty and knock him down from behind. Dragon Kid seemed to think he could Generico’s Yakuza kicks due to his shorter stature, but that didn’t go quite as planned, although generally he had a solid answer for almost everything Generico threw at him.

 

The scariest part seemed not to fuck either competitor up, as Generico’s Top Rope Brainbuster was countered with a Stunner that saw Dragon Kid bounce off the top rope and take a bump too. But Dragon Kid simply didn’t have enough when Generico kicked out of the Springbaord Hurricanrana, getting cut off with a Yakuza kick on the top rope and being put down with the Turnbuckle Brainbuster. Would love to see a rematch.

 

Rating: ****

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament Semifinal Match
Alex Shelley vs. Roderick Strong

 

Definitely not as interesting as their ROH matches, once again not recognizing their history there on this evening. However, this was still very good as par the course so far on this card. Although it’ll get a high rating, this lacked something extra special to really dig in and analyze. Perhaps the best story told was that Shelley couldn’t put Strong down with anything, not even the Shiranui, which get a great reaction when Strong kicked out of it.

 

Instead of aiming for a submission to put down Shelley, Strong just used consecutive Tiger Drivers to get the job done, not allowing Shelley any time to recover from the first. Perhaps that’s the story of desperation for a night in which the finalists have to pull triple-duty – get the job done quickly and by any means necessary, even if trademarks spots have to be arguably spammed.

 

Rating: ***3/4

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament Semifinal Match
CIMA vs. PAC

 

Good showing from PAC here to earn him a Dragon Gate invitation afterwards. He did his best to avoid CIMA’s Schwein, spiking the legend on his head a couple times. The first was with a DDT, the second was CIMA’s fault as he didn’t rotate enough on a head-scissors, getting dropped on his head. Once again though, there’s not much to dig into this match, and the fact that looks like it was intended to be a sequel of sorts to CIMA vs. Generico a year earlier, comes up a bit disappointing, To state the obvious, PAC simply was not on Generico’s level yet for crowd connection and building drama. The finish really told that when he botched a top rope move that got saved when CIMA finished it with a Super Schwein, probably taking the match home early to rest his neck before the final.

 

Rating: ***1/2

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament Semifinal Match
El Generico vs. Nigel McGuinness

 

Easily my favorite match of the night, as this focused on two great characters colliding, adding drama to this on the level of an ROH main event at the time.  McGuinness even got some minor heel heat, which fit in well as he targeted Generico’s left shoulder with various strikes and submissions. The real story was centered around their signature moves though, such as McGuinness evading a Yakuza kick, instead taking advantage of Generico’s failure to scout the corner headstand kick.

 

However, Generico would prove to have that scouted later, hitting an instant Yakuza kick to cut it off, while also avoiding lariats throughout the match. McGuinness stayed focused on Generico’s left arm to cut him off, but his overreliance on the rebound lariat attempt came back to bite him, as Generico finished him with a desperate schoolboy pin. These two definitely need another round, but in an ROH ring.

 

Rating: ****

 

Battle of Los Angeles Tournament Final – Elimination Match
El Generico vs. CIMA vs. Roderick Strong

 

An excellent finale that stood out over most of the prior tournament matches, as this never stopped and saw some quality scouting throughout. It started with a bunch of strike exchanges to have all three down early, but managed to turn into CIMA gaining the advantage when he tossed Generico off the top rope and then hit a Frog Splash on Strong.

 

I couldn’t believe Generico tooks his signature spots to the apron, hitting a Yakuza kick and Brainbuster on Strong on that section. But CIMA would intervene as Strong recovered, hitting an uppercut and then an Apron Air Raid Crash for a tremendous pop. Back in the ring, Generico tried to find the fighting spirit, popping up immediately after a Brainbuster, but succumbed to the Schwein.

 

Strong wasted no time reinserting himself when Generico got eliminated, having a hot finale with CIMA. CIMA couldn’t be denied on this night though, fueled after losing in the prior year’s BOLA finale; not even Strong kicking out of the Air Raid Crash was enough. CIMA just stayed determined, hitting a Package Cross Armed Powerbomb to finish off Strong.

 

Post-match, PWG Champion Bryan Danielson presented CIMA with the BOLA Trophy, teasing a rematch between the two for the title. CIMA closed the night with a classy speech and his Typhoon stablemates present, vowing to return to PWG as soon as possible.

 

Rating: ****

 

Although the card can get a bit monotonous due to its format, this gets the highest recommendation, especially since the best matches weren’t raved enough to get placed on compilations. A stellar card that had the best come at the very end, which is what every show should strive for in its pacing.

 

Up next – Schadenfreude
Matches will include:
Scott Lost vs. Davey Richards
El Generico vs. Jack Evans
Bryan Danielson vs. Roderick Strong



#68 G. Badger

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Posted 28 May 2018 - 10:45 AM

Nice to see you're back doing this!

Night 3 2007 is full of very good to great matches but, fans of PWG nowadays might be disappointed that there's no ****1/2+ match(es) :) Along with Giant Sized Annual, this showed PWG taking itself seriously enough to be comparable to what ROH was doing.




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